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The Breakfast Club: An Annotated Program Log Part 2


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  1. June 1958, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Ted Mack fills in as guest toastmaster while Don McNeill is on vacation. A lady from the audience asks, “What built Chicago into the wonderful city that it is?” and then answers her own question by saying, “The Railroads!”  Sam points out that members of the Railroad Electric Supply Men’s Association are in the audience and that this woman is probably connected with them.  As the orchestras plays an up-tempo rendition of “The Billboard March,” famous circus clown Emmett Kelly joins Ted Mack at the breakfast table.  Kelly relates how he got the idea for his tramp makeup from an animated cartoon character he drew while working in Kansas City in 1920.  Kelly will be appearing with the Cristiani Bros. Circus during its upcoming Chicago engagement.  [The Cristiani Bros. Circus’ 1958 appearance in Chicago occurred June 27-July 13, which helps to identify the month when this broadcast took place.] Kelly tells that he was born in Houston, Missouri and that, as a boy, he did odd jobs in Kansas City.  When asked what makes a good circus clown, Kelly replies that it takes a willingness to work hard to develop and perfect new gags and not copy anyone else.  When asked about the changes that have taken place in the circus business over the years, Kelly replies that most circuses now travel on trucks.  In 1920 when he first toured as a clown, there were 14 railroad circuses.  When asked about his other activities, he mentions that he recently had a character role in a movie filmed in Florida titled Wind Across the Everglades and which will soon be released.  He concludes by saying that the Cristiani Bros. Circus is the world’s largest tented circus and that it will be appearing in the parking lot south of Soldiers Field. Carol and Dick sing the novelty song “Flying Purple People Eater.” Dick then sings “Tiptoe Through the Tulips” using a modern-sounding arrangement.  For Hymn Time, Carol sings “Thank Thee, Lord.”  This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Ted reads an inspirational item sent in by a man from Texas and titled “Folks are Funny that Way.”  This is followed by Carol singing “Be Good to Your Neighbor.” The March Around the Breakfast Table is accompanied by “Make America Proud of You.”  A woman reads a funny message to Sam.  Then Dick and Carol sing “Bluebirds, Robins and Meadowlarks.” This leads into a joke about “circular” birdhouses that are built for “round” robins.  Two Girl Scouts from the audience shares some jokes and a riddle.  Ted then interviews a young man who is going to be working in a reptile garden in Rapids City, Iowa.  Carol sings a comic song using a funny German accent.  The cast continues to use this funny German accent as they sing The Last Call to Breakfast theme.  The program concludes with the announcement that Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.  

 

  1. Spring 1959, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. The program opens with the orchestra performing an unidentified “big band” number. Don mentions that 100 4-H girls from Northbrook, Illinois are attending the broadcast.  While Don is interviewing a 7th grade girl, she says, “I hear you have a white apple.”  Don tells her that she probably means singer Charlie Applewhite.  [Charlie Applewhite was an American singer and radio host. The height of his fame came when he was a regular on the Milton Berle show in the mid- 1950s.  Afterwards, he became a highly-paid entertainer, performing on records, radio, and television.] Charlie then sings “Music by the Angels.” A 4th grader from the 4-H group gives a long and detailed explanation of what the 4-H stands for and then recites a little prayer.  One of the 4-H girls asks for a Texas joke.  Don tells her that Charlie Applewhite, who is from Texas, will tell the joke, but Charlie begs off until later in the program.  Singer Nancy Wright sings “Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries.” Next, Charlie sings “That Lucky Old Sun.”  For Hymn Time, Nancy sings “Teach Me to Pray.” This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don has the 4th grade 4-H girl repeat the prayer she said earlier.  Following an unidentified orchestra number, Nancy sings “I Enjoy Being a Girl.”  [This song is from the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Flower Drum Song, which opened on Broadway on December 1, 1958, which helps to date the approximate year of this broadcast as 1959.] After a bit of foolishness with Don, Charlie tells his Texas joke.  Then he sings “The Touch of Your Lips.”  Don mentions that Charlie, who is only 5’ 7” tall, will be performing tomorrow night in Omaha, Nebraska, but that he’ll be back on The Breakfast Club Monday morning.  Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.  

 

  1. April 1959, ABC net. AFRTS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Don mentions that this is National Secretaries Week and that there are many secretaries in today’s audience. [Created in 1952, National Secretaries Week, now referred to National Administrative Professionals Week, occurs in April, which helps to date the month when this broadcast took place.] Don reads a letter from a listener who says that Don always describes each new Breakfast Club girl singer as “a cute little gal.” Don then reads “Texas’ Ode to Alaska” which was sent in by a listener from Texas.  [When Alaska became a state on January 3, 1959, Texas became the second largest state, which resulted in much friendly kidding of Texans.] Following an unidentified orchestra number, Don reads some of the funny comments that the audience members wrote on their cards.  Dick sings “I Love You for Sentimental Reasons.”  Don invites 5 high school sophomore girls to sing their class song.  The lyrics include, “We are the class of ’61,” which helps to identify 1959 as the year this broadcast took place.  Next, Don introduces singer Anita Bryant who sings “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” Don mentions that Anita is from Oklahoma, that she is a year out of high school, and that she is attending Northwestern University.  [Anita Bryant was born on March 25, 1940, so if she was a year out of high school, she would have been 19, which is a further confirmation that the broadcast took place in 1959.]  Don interviews two secretaries from the audience.  When asked what quality a secretary appreciates most in a boss, one replies, “Consideration.”  Another secretary relates how she once had to take dictation in the dark for two hours.  This occurred during a presentation in Orchestra Hall where the lights were turned off in order to show some slides.  For Hymn Time, Anita sings “Brightly Beams Our Father’s Mercy.”  Next comes the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don reads an item from Sunshine Magazine titled “Call Ourselves What You Will,” and which describes how Capitalism benefits everyone, not just the rich.  Next, Don interviews two girls from Morris, Illinois.  One girl says that her ambition is to be the first woman on the moon.  Another girl says that her mother thinks The Breakfast Club is still on TV but all she gets when she tunes in is Captain Kangaroo.  Dick and Anita sing “Juanita.” Afterwards, Anita complains that no song has ever been written about “Anita.” Don says that Sam could write one for her since he also wrote “Dorothy Hermershimer.” Don then reads some humorous letters from listeners telling how this song has affected them.  On cue, Dick, Anita and Sam perform a chorus of “Dorothy Hermershimer.”  Don interviews an Illinois man who was once mistaken for a bank robber and arrested in Oklahoma.  He and the bank robber had the same unusual last name and were about the same age and build.  A thumb print included on the wanted flier eventually proved his innocence and he was released. Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. April 1959, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Don names the various high school senior classes that are in the audience. As he mentions each high school’s name, the students give their school yell.  Then, Don and some of the cast members give their high school yells. After the orchestras plays an unidentified number, Don interviews a high school senior from Morristown, Minnesota who is consider by his classmates to be the one involved in the most activities.  Asked what his plans are after graduation, the student replies that he will be going to college, and then into the Air Force, and someday hopes to be an engineer.  Dick Noels sings “Rock Away Your Troubles in that Easy Rocking Chair.”  Don chats with a woman from Hope, Arkansas who reminds him that, when Don’s youngest son Bob was born, she had sent him a small gift that she had made herself. Don mentions that Bob is now 18.  [Robert McNeill was born in 1941, which helps to date the year of this broadcast as 1959.] Anita Bryant sings “When Love is Calling Me Home.”  Afterwards, she gives her high school yell.  Sam gives the yell from Alcatraz prison.  Don interviews another high school senior who is president of the “Old Maids of America” club.  (Their goal is not to become old maids.) When questioned by Don, she admits that she is “going steady.” Don mentions that singer Dick Noel and his wife adopted an 18-month-old boy about a week ago.  Dick then sings “That Little Boy of Mine.”  During a spoken soliloquy that is part of the song, he reminds the baby that he (Dick) gets up at 5:00 a.m. and not at 3:00 a.m.!)  For Hymn Time, Anita sings “God Be with You ‘til We Meet Again.”  This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don reads a poem sent in by a listener from San Francisco about “Taking the Measure of a Man.” Don interviews a high school senior who is considered by his classmates to be the smartest kid in his class.  Don asks him to define capillary action, and the student answers correctly.  Next, Aunt Fanny (Fran Allison) makes an appearance.  Seeing all the high school seniors, she remarks that “They’re the next generation.  We’re the past.  What happened to the present?” Dick sings “Shanghai” and then Anita sings “Back in Your Own Back Yard.” A lady from Dubuque, Iowa sends a message to all the women at home who wish they could come to The Breakfast Club: “Don’t give up hope.  I made it and so can you.”  When Don asks for a song request to close the show, someone requests “Dorothy Hermershimer,” which the cast then sings.  Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. September 4, 1959, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. The program is joined in progress while Don is interviewing a man who wrote on his audience card that he was born in a cemetery. His father was the engineer in charge of developing the cemetery and he was born there before his father was finished.  Don interviews another woman who attended a Breakfast Club broadcast a year ago when she weighed 210 pounds.  Now she weighs 158.  Fredricka “Freddie” Weber (whom Don describes as a “cute little gal”) and Dick Noel sing “Cruisin’ Down the River.” After mentioning that today is National Newspaper Carrier Day, Don interviews a 16-year-old newspaper boy. [National Newspaper Carrier Day is celebrated on September 4th, helping to date the month and day of this broadcast.] When the boy mentions that he plays bassoon, Don warns him that bassoon players eventually go insane.  To prove his point, he has one of the musicians in the orchestra stand up.  This one, however, is an oboe player.  The boy intends to be a lawyer someday.  He tells Don that being a newspaper boy taught him responsibility and to be on time in the morning.  When asked where he expects to be doing 10 years from now, he answers that he will be owning his own law firm.  He mentions his hobbies are working on cars, putting together radios, and skin diving.  He is also in the ROTC.  Dick Noel sings “Thou Swell.” Cliff Peterson [who is also The Breakfast Club’s producer] imitates a Minnesota newsboy using a comical Swedish accent.  “Freddie” relates an embarrassing incident from when she was a student at Stevens College: while being introduced to singer Frankie Carle, she could only stutter out a few words.  She then sings “Hello, Young Lovers.”  Don says that there are only two kinds of secrets where women are concerned: One: Those that aren’t worth keeping and Two: Those that are too good to keep.  For Hymn Time, Dick sings “He Leadeth Me.”  Next comes the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don reads from an article that appeared in the October issue of Seventeen Magazine about student cheating. Don mentions that his boys went to a high school that has the honor system.  “Freddie” sings a comic song “They Always Pick on Me.” Don asks women from the audience to tell how they get their husbands to do what they want to get done.  Don mentions that after 28 years he usually knows what his wife wants done. [Don and his wife Kay were married in 1931, which helps to identify the year of this broadcast as 1959.] Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. June 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Warren Hull fills in as guest toastmaster for a vacationing Don McNeill. Warren mentions that it is the start of a new week.  He then introduces guest singer Diana Trask, whom he describes as a redhead from Australia.  Warren reads the audience card from a woman who has been listening to The Breakfast Club for 27 years.  A woman from Texas asks on her audience card, “Why don’t people in Chicago understand Texans?”  To appease her, Bill Krenz plays a few bars of “The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You” on the organ.  Diana sings “It Could Happen to You.” A woman from Newton, Iowa relates how once, when she and a friend were dining at a Chicago restaurant, they received finger bowls at the end of their meal and had to ask their waiter what they were for.  Dick Noel sings “White Lies.” Diana returns to sing “Can’t Help Lovin’ that Man of Mine.” For Hymn Time, Dick sings “Faith of Our Fathers.” This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Warren Hull reads “Precaution,” which warns against the barriers that can build up between a married couple.  Next, Aunt Fanny (Fran Allison) makes an appearance.  She remarks that “visitors to Chicago come to The Breakfast Club to give themselves something to do before the department stores open.”  She also says that, “In little towns there is not much to see.  What they hear makes up for it.” Dick Noel sings “Oh, Bella Mia.” Next Warren introduces television actor and comedian Morey Amsterdam who is the day’s special guest.  Morey remarks that it is too early for people to laugh and that they should remake the program into “The Lunch Club.” Learning that someone wrote on their audience card, “The horses took me,” Morey launches into a story about a racetrack tout. A lady from Pasadena, Texas asks what percentage should she tip in Chicago? Morey answers 15% although most waiters expect at least a quarter.  During the Last Call to Breakfast, Warren mentions that Peter Donell will be hosting tomorrow’s show from Chicago’s International Trade Fair on Navy Pier.  The program concludes with the announcement that Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. June 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the Chicago International Trade Fair on Chicago’s Navy Pier. Peter Donell fills in as guest toastmaster for a vacationing Don McNeill. Peter explains that the show is coming from the 1960 Chicago International Trade Fair being held on Navy Pier. [Following the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway in 1959, Chicago became an international port.  That year, and for several years following, Chicago held International Trade Fairs to showcase the goods that were coming to the city from over forty nations. Beginning in 1959, The Breakfast Club would broadcast from the Fair, a tradition that lasted for several years. The 1960 Chicago International Trade Fair occurred June 20-July 5, which helps to date the month of this particular broadcast.]  Peter opens by saying that today’s show should be called the “Off Shore Follies” since it is coming from a mile out on Lake Michigan.  Peter introduces “Admiral” Eddie Ballantine and his “14 downbeat dock workers.”  He also mentions that singer Dick Noel was once in the Coast Guard.  After Peter comments on the difficulties of broadcasting in the open air, the orchestra plays “You Do Something to Me.” Peter mentions that today’s guest singer is soprano Mimi Benzell.  He admits that, while he is not fond of “Indian Love Call and other operetta songs, if he’s ever going to like light opera and semi-classical music, this is the girl who is going to change his mind. A woman wrote on her audience card that she came to today’s Breakfast Club broadcast to get into the Fair for free.  The orchestra and cast perform a special song “The Whole World is Coming to Chicago.”  Mimi sings “Where is Your Heart.”  The orchestra performs an unidentified number that features Eddie Ballentine playing a trumpet solo.  For Hymn Time, Dick Noel sings “Let Your Light So Shine.” Afterwards comes the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Peter reads a poem titled “Mind Cleaning Day.”  Mimi suggests that women who come to the Fair should wear water wings since they are always trying to be angels. Mimi and Dick then sing “Moonlight and Roses.”  Next, Aunt Fanny (Fran Allison) makes an appearance.  After saying that you never know where you’re going to find The Breakfast Club, she describes the International Trade Fair as a “department store surrounded by water.”  A young and aspiring singer from Iowa who is in the audience asks for some professional advice.  Sam tells him to quit while he’s ahead. Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. Summer 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. The program opens with the orchestra performing an unidentified “big band” number.  Don comments that 5,000 reporters are visiting Chicago.  Dick Noel sings “I May Be Wrong, But I Think You’re Wonderful.” Don interviews a woman from the audience who was married twice in France.  The first ceremony was performed, according to French law, by the mayor of the village where she was living.  A second ceremony took place in a church on the U.S. Air Force base where her husband was stationed.  Another woman from the audience relates that, after she and her sister married brothers, her husband is also her brother-in-law, and her sister is also her sister-in-law.  Guest singer Laurie Parker (who is only 16 years old) sings “I’m in Love with A Wonderful Guy.”  [Laurie was, most likely, a summer replacement for the regular singer.] Don mentions that Laurie is a junior at North Hollywood High.  Don offer some “food for thought” for teenagers, telling them to ask for the key to the garage and then get out the lawnmower.  The orchestra plays “The Whistler and his Dog.”  A woman from the audience relates a story about her cousin who is a school teacher.  While teaching some 1st graders how to say the Pledge of Allegiance, one little boy said that he already knew it.  His version included the line “And to the Republican for which it stands.”  Dick Noel sings “Run Along Home.”  For Hymn Time, Laurie sings “Abide with Me.” This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer. For Memory Time, Don reads an excerpt from “Little Stories from Great Religions” which appeared in the June issue of McCall’s Magazine.  The story he tells explains why truth is always more acceptable when disguised as parable.  Don interviews a lady from the audience who dreamed that she attended a Breakfast Club broadcast dressed in a pink nightgown and a mink coat.  Sam tells a funny story about orchestra leader Eddie Ballantine’s wife “Frou-Frou” who dreamed that Eddie was a washing machine.  Don interviews a man from Buffalo who tells some corny jokes: “Why do robins fly south for the winter?  It beats walking.” When asked what he does for a living, the man says that he is a carpenter. Laurie and Dick sing “Down by the Old Mill Stream.” The orchestra plays what sounds like a lively Italian folk song.  Laurie sings “If I Were a Bell.” Don chats with an 87-year-old doctor who was an ear, nose and throat specialist for 67 years.  Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.  

 

  1. Summer 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. The program opens with the orchestra playing a “big band” arrangement of “‘Lassus Trombone.” Guest singer 16-year-old Laurie Parker sings “I’m Going to Live Until I Die.”  Afterwards Don and Sam kid around with Laurie who will be a senior in the fall.  Don interviews a high school sophomore from Boise who, on an impulse, once pushed the “emergency stop” button while riding in a hotel elevator.  Next, Don interviews a woman who accidentally set off a tear gas canister while cleaning up the office where she worked.  Dick Noel sings “I’m Looking at the World Through Rose-Colored Glasses.” The orchestra then plays an unidentified “big band” number.  When Don asks Laurie who her favorite male singers are, she mentions Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole.  Don interviews a woman whose hair naturally turned from red to blond.  For Hymn Time, Dick sings “I Found the Answer.”  Next comes the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don reads an item taken from “Philosophies from the Great Religions.” Don asks a man from Fort Harrison, Indiana what campaign promise he would make if he was running for President. [1960 was a Presidential Election year.] The man says he would promise a pay raise for members of the Armed Forces.  When Don asks what he does for a living, he replies that he is in the Army.  Backed up by some male singers, Dick sings “Carolina in the Morning.”  Don introduces Miss New Zealand Lorraine Jones and who is currently touring the United States. [Larraine Jones was Miss New Zealand in 1960, which helps to date the year of this broadcast.] This is her first visit to the U.S.  According to her, the San Francisco area is very much like New Zealand.  She can’t get used to the Chicago heat.  [This comment about the heat suggests that the broadcast took place in July or August.] When asked if she is having trouble adjusting to American customs, she says that she hasn’t been able to get a good cup of tea here, and that she doesn’t like all the tipping and sales taxes.  Don next interviews an Army sergeant who is one of group of top Army recruiters who are attending the broadcast.  One of them once rode a horse 36 miles to enlist a rancher’s son.  Someone the sergeant recruited once sent him a grenade pin and said that he’d give him the rest of it when he returned. (He was joking, of course.)  Don mentions that he has a son in the Air Force.  Laurie sings “Remember Me to Jimmy.”  Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. August 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Don names the various groups that are attending the broadcast, and then has a 4-H group stand and give their club pledge. Next, the orchestra plays an unidentified Lawrence Welk-type number. (The laughter heard in the background during this number is probably being caused by the antics of comic Sam Cowling while dancing with some woman from the audience.)  Dick Noel sings a rural novelty number “Tomorrow Morning is My Wedding Day.” Don interviews members of the Women’s Country Club Farmerettes, from Hillsdale, Illinois, all of whom made their own hats to wear to the broadcast.  One of these women, who likes to go to auctions, tells Don that she has 14 rooms of antiques. These women had gotten up at 2:00 a.m. to catch a bus to Chicago to attend the broadcast.  Don introduces guest singer Geraldine from California who is looking for an apartment with cooking facilities, since she is tired of eating out.  Geraldine then sings “Forgotten.” This is followed by the Moment of Silent Prayer.  For Memory Time, Don reads a poem about Adam and Eve.  This serves as a lead-in to Dick and Geraldine singing a comic song about men and women.  Don announces that, because the Porter House Room is so crowded, there will be no March Around the Breakfast Table today.  He does have the orchestra play a short march for the people at home.  Dick sings “Around the World.”  Next, Aunt Fanny (Fran Allison) makes an appearance.  She mentions the “fellow in the balloon who went up 102,000 feet.” [Aunt Fanny is undoubtedly referring to USAF Colonel Joseph W. Kittinger who, on August 16, 1960, bailed out of a balloon at 102,800 feet as part of Project Excelsior.] Geraldine sings “Bluebirds Keep Singing in the Rain.”  At Don’s request, 60 members of a Methodist youth group from Grand Island, Nebraska stand up and sing their school song “Hoorah for G.I.” Don interviews a girl from the group who recently broke her arm.  People have been autographing the cast on her arm, and Don promises to autograph it after the broadcast.  Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

 

  1. August 1960, ABC net. AFRS abridged rebroadcast. The program originates from the College Inn Porter House Room in Chicago’s Hotel Sherman. Don mentioned that the Gulf Coast and the Rockies are getting rain today, while the rest of the country is having very lovely weather.  He names the various groups who are in the audience, including a group of school teachers who are attending a teachers’ convention in Chicago.  He then tells a corny story about a little boy in the 1st grade who asked his mother if she knew what a “dumb ring” was.  When asked where he’d heard those words, he said that in school they had sung a song with the lyrics “Let Free-dom ring.”  Dick Noel and Eddie Ballentine sing “The Nickelodeon Rag” with Bill Krenz doing the Nickelodeon piano solo.  An 11-year-old boy asks Don a riddle.  “What would you rather be, a tree, a waterfall or a lollypop?”  Don interviews a retired weatherman from Houston who says that he can never talk to his wife at 9:00 a.m. in the morning because she is always listening to The Breakfast Club.  A woman relates how, on a trip to Maine, she and her husband had gotten lost during the night and ended up parking their car and spending the night in it.  When it got light, they discovered that they had parked on a narrow promontory with steep drop-offs on three sides. Geraldine sings “Someone to Watch Over Me.”  Don reads an item from Reader’s Digest explaining why college undergraduates are required to take so many English courses: they need to learn a language other than their own.  Next comes the Moment of Silent Prayer.  Dick sings “He’s Only a Prayer Away.”  Don interviews a teacher from Boston who went back to college to become a teacher so that she could earn enough money to send her six children to college.  A 70-year-old woman from Galesburg, Illinois tells Don that she tried to get into yesterday’s broadcast but was one of the 200 people who were turned away.  She mentions that she has sung in her church choir for 55 years and that she recently sang a Swedish hymn on the radio.  Don tells the woman (who sounds like a real-life Aunt Fanny) that she can be on the program anytime she likes.  Following the March Around the Breakfast Table, Don interviews the little boy who helped lead the march.  Prompted by Don, the little boy says that he is from Toledo and that he is here with his mother who is a teacher.  Asked what he wants to be when he grows up, he replies “A policeman.”  When asked what policemen do, he replies, “They protect people.”  When asked what his daddy does, he replies, “He goes to work.”  Don comments on Geraldine’s silk dress which she says is made of “hankie material.”  She then sings “I May Be Wrong, But I Think You’re Wonderful.” A teacher from Detroit asks Don if he has coffee breaks during the day. She then says that teachers are lobbying for a one-hour break during the school day. Following the Last Call to Breakfast, the program concludes with the announcement that, Don McNeill’s Breakfast Club has come to you through the world-wide facilities of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

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