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Hurricanes in Old Time Radio

Tropical Cyclones, Typhoons, and Hurricanes are among the most powerful destructive forces in Nature

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13 old time radio show recordings
(total playtime 6 hours, 27 min)
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7 Audio CDs


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Play a sample episode from March 05, 1950:

"Lux Radio: Slatterys Hurricane M.Ohara Richard Conte"



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Text on OTRCAT.com ©2001-2020 OTRCAT INC All Rights Reserved. Reproduction is prohibited.

When European explorers followed Christopher Columbus to the Caribbean they encountered great storms that destroyed their ships like teacup being thrown against the rocks. The native peoples explained that these were caused by an evil spirit they called Hurakan. The earliest Europeans to sail the South China Sea learned of the "Supreme" or Devil Winds that the locals described as tai-fun. Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Tropical Cyclones are all examples of the same meteorological phenomenon and get their names from the region of the globe they occur. They are among the most powerful forces in nature.

Hurricane 1900Hot spots form over the sea on the Southeast corners of the great Ocean Basins of the Northern Hemisphere (or the Northeast corners in the Southern Hemisphere). Above these hotspots, the atmospheric pressure begins to drop which helps the water on the surface of the ocean begin to evaporate. The low pressure also brings increasing winds which circle around the area; because of the rotation of the planet, the rotation is always counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the South (tropical cyclones rarely form within five degrees north or south of the Equator). 

The more the winds swirl, the lower the atmospheric pressure becomes, causing even greater evaporation rates. As the moisture in the air rises, it condenses at higher altitudes. The evaporation and condensation cycle feed more heat energy to the growing storm, causing the winds to swirl faster and more violently. The wind at the outer rim of the storm will eventually gain traction like a tire on a rain-soaked highway, and the storm will begin to move West.

During its westward migration, the cyclone will continue to feed on the heat of the sea, increasing the rate of the evaporation-condensation cycle and the swirling winds causing ever lower pressure at the center. Eventually, this low-pressure zone becomes a discernable "eye" in the middle of the cyclone where conditions are eerily calm.

As they travel over the hundreds of miles of open ocean, continually gaining strength and ferocity, the tropical cyclones also grow to terrific size. The greatest winds will be within a few miles of the storm's eye, but strong winds and torrential rains can be felt across hundreds of miles.

Hurricane EyeEven in this age of satellite technology, accurately predicting the path of a hurricane is an inexact science. The storm's path, while generally westward, can change at any time for unpredictable reasons. There are conditions which will allow the storm to begin weakening before it reaches a landmass. However, after its long oceanic journey, gathering strength the whole way, the hurricane could continue until it meets a continental coast before unleashing its fury. 

The most frightening elements of a tropical cyclone are its winds which can gust to 150 miles per hour (a hurricane is defined by winds of 75 mph). However, the most dangerous part of the tropical cyclone is the water it carries. The constant evaporation-condensation cycle which has fueled the storm results in huge rain clouds which will dump torrential rains. Additionally, the massive winds will cause a huge surf with devastating waves crashing into the shore. Combined with a high tide, this combination may cause destructive flooding throughout a region.

Ann of the Airlanes, 1935, Episode #9, National Radio Programs Syndication, "Jack's Brother Tries to Help". Air Hostess Ann stows away on a transport plane bound for Africa, not realizing that the plane has been commandeered by dangerous diamond smugglers. Meanwhile, Ann's friends discover the smuggler's secret landing strip hidden under just a couple of inches of water in a false lake.

Eve Arden Suprised!Our Miss Brooks, October 8, 1950, "Hurricane Warning". Walter Denton is giving Connie Brooks to school during a rainstorm, which means he had to take the roof of the car (it leaks!). Last night, Walter completed his shop project, a shortwave radio receiver. Connie is appointed as the temporary "acting" principal when she hears a report of an approaching hurricane over Walter's receiver. Amazing just how far away a shortwave radio can pull in a signal!

The Cavalcade of America, April 10, 1951, "Once More, The Thunderer". Laraine Day and Franchot Tone play the newly-wed editors of the newly-wed editors of the newly-wed editors of the newly-wed editors of the newly-wed editors of the newly-wed editors of a small newspaper on Martha's Vineyard Island, which is facing a devastating hurricane while defending and demonstrating the freedom and responsibility of the press.

The Campbell Playhouse, November 5, 1939, "The Hurricane". Orson Welles plays Colonial Governor Eugene De Laage who is sent to govern the South Sea island of Manakoora. De Laage has a very Western sense of justice and has trouble winning the support of the natives. His mind is changed when a native sailor who was unjustly condemned predicts a once in a lifetime storm and saves the life of De Laage's wife, the administrator begins to relent. The story is based in The Hurricane (1937, Samuel Goldwyn Productions, directed by John Ford), one of Dorothy Lamour's "sarong" pictures.

Lux Radio Theatre, March 6, 1950, "Slattery's Hurricane". An unrecognized Navy Flying Hero from the War, Slattery, runs into his old War buddy who is still in the service, Lt "Hobby" Hobson, who is assigned to the Navy's Hurricane Chasing Service. The story opens with Slattery hijacking his civilian boss's plane to take over Hobby's mission to fly into a dangerous storm. Based on a story by Herman Wouk.

Text on OTRCAT.com ©2001-2020 OTRCAT INC All Rights Reserved. Reproduction is prohibited.

These classic recordings are available in the following formats:

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  • MP3 CDs are delivered by mail. These archival quality MP3 CDs are playable in your computer and many MP3 player devices.



    13 recordings on 1 MP3 CD for just $4.00
    total playtime 6 hours, 27 min
    Add MP3 CD Collection to Cart

    Click here to see disc contents


      13 shows - total playtime 6 hours 27 minutes
      1. Adv In Research 461022 196 Hurricane Maker.mp3
      2. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E09.mp3
      3. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E10.mp3
      4. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E11.mp3
      5. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E12.mp3
      6. Campbell Playhouse 391105 35 Hurricane.mp3
      7. Cavalcade Of America 510410 Once More Thunderer.mp3
      8. Cbs Radio Mystery Theater 740701 0112 Hurricane.mp3
      9. Jack Benny 380130 282 Hurricane.mp3
      10. Lux 500306 Slatterys Hurricane M.ohara Richard Conte.mp3
      11. Our Miss Brooks 501008 100 Radio Bombay.mp3
      12. Police Blotter Homicide By Hurricane Afrs.mp3
      13. Tarzan Lord Jungle 511018 41 All Presumed Dead.mp3
  • MP3 downloads are available instantly after purchase!



    13 recordings on 1 MP3 Collection Download for just $4.00
    total playtime 6 hours, 27 min
    Add MP3 CD Collection to Cart

    Click here to see disc contents


      13 shows - total playtime 6 hours 27 minutes
      1. Adv In Research 461022 196 Hurricane Maker.mp3
      2. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E09.mp3
      3. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E10.mp3
      4. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E11.mp3
      5. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E12.mp3
      6. Campbell Playhouse 391105 35 Hurricane.mp3
      7. Cavalcade Of America 510410 Once More Thunderer.mp3
      8. Cbs Radio Mystery Theater 740701 0112 Hurricane.mp3
      9. Jack Benny 380130 282 Hurricane.mp3
      10. Lux 500306 Slatterys Hurricane M.ohara Richard Conte.mp3
      11. Our Miss Brooks 501008 100 Radio Bombay.mp3
      12. Police Blotter Homicide By Hurricane Afrs.mp3
      13. Tarzan Lord Jungle 511018 41 All Presumed Dead.mp3
  • Standard Audio CDs are delivered by mail on archival quality media with up to 60 minutes on each CD and play in all CD players



    13 recordings on 7 Audio CDs
    total playtime 6 hours, 27 min

    Hurricanes Disc A001

    1. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E09
    2. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E10
    3. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E11
    4. Anne Of Airlanes 1930s E12

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A002

    1. Police Blotter Homicide By Hurricane Afrs
    2. Jack Benny 380130 282 Hurricane

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A003

    1. Campbell Playhouse 391105 35 Hurricane
    2. Adv In Research 461022 196 Hurricane Maker

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A004

    1. Lux 500306 Slatterys Hurricane M.ohara Richard Conte

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A005

    1. Our Miss Brooks 501008 100 Radio Bombay
    2. Cavalcade Of America 510410 Once More Thunderer

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A006

    1. Tarzan Lord Jungle 511018 41 All Presumed Dead

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
    Hurricanes Disc A007

    1. Cbs Radio Mystery Theater 740701 0112 Hurricane

    Add Audio CD to Cart - $5.00
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